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Old 06-02-2004, 09:27 AM   #1
JHP
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Lead free ammo and indoor range health concerns

As a bullseye shooter for several years it seems that every few months I hear of someone with elevated lead levels from indoor shooting.I've been using "Winclean" ammo in my guns for the last few years for this reason and also because of easier cleanup. When the range is busy some nights there are even a few guys who wear Home depot respirators.Any thoughts?
 
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Old 06-08-2004, 12:06 PM   #2
JHP
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Anyone concerned enough to comment?
 
Old 06-08-2004, 05:00 PM   #3
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We have fans

At the range where I shoot, we have big fans sucking the air out. There are vents above and behind the shooter so the air movement is from behind the shooter and down range. It keeps the air clean, but is really cold in the winter months.

Actually, I thought a lot of the lead in the air came from the lead in the priming compound.

wlambert
 
Old 06-08-2004, 06:19 PM   #4
JHP
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I,ve heard the the military was going to leadless "Green" ammo by 2005 for training and indoor ranges are starting to head in that direction. As an aside Me and a buddy shot some class III at "The Gun Store" in Las Vegas
last week. They were shooting PMC Green frangible exclusively. Had a great time. When factoring in the cost of regular indoor range cleanup I wonder if it almost offsets the higher cost of the frangible ammo. The "Winclean" that I use costs out the same as regular leaded fmj anyway.
 
Old 06-13-2004, 05:50 PM   #5
JHP
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wlambert.
Didn't respond in last post. The primer is in fact one of the main sources of lead. Also the base of nonenclosed bullets vaporize lead on firing. No
ventillation system is efficient enough to get it all away from the shooter hence all the interest at many ranges and in the military toward "Green"
ammo.As far as the cold in winter well our group shoots outdoors. Enough said.
 
Old 06-14-2004, 05:04 AM   #6
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Some months back, several guys who shoot matches at one of the indoor ranges here had their lead levels checked; some were kinda high. Doesn't surprise me, as the owner of the business doesn't put much money back into maintenence/upkeep, though he constantly brags about his high profits! Anyhow, those who found their lead levels elevated went out and got masks;one guy also wears disposable "booties" so he won't bring lead into his house. (But then, he's a little selective about his risk management--he's got a cell phone practically hard wired to his head, even when he drives.) Anyhow, follow-up testing showed that these fellows' lead levels have decreased somewhat. I'm not certain how much we grownups need to be worried about this anyway; much of what I've read suggests that elevated lead levels are WAY more worrisome in children than with adults. Personally, my solution is just not to shoot at the range in question too often, as I don't mind being outdoors in most kinds of weather.
 
Old 06-14-2004, 12:52 PM   #7
JHP
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Brian D.
Lead exposure presents many health risks proportionate to amount absorbed. Many will remember guys who neglected proper hearing protection years ago who are now paying the price. I'm certainly not tossing and turning every night thinking about it, but it really is something that many shooters seem to be discussing and dealing with now more than ever. Until some of the boys I shoot with pointed the "Lead thing" out a while back I wasn't too concerned, but hey I may be a little macho but I'm not stupid enough to ignore warnings. I heard it is worse for kids and I do shoot with my two boys once in a while. I got this link about lead from someone at the range. Http://marko.gunsnet.net/lead.html. And by the way we now have started using lead filtering masks at indoor ranges.
 
Old 06-14-2004, 12:58 PM   #8
JHP
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Correction on that last link. Http://markco.gunsnet.net/lead.html
 
Old 08-31-2004, 12:35 AM   #9
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Lead is a real concern! After shooting indoors for a few years, My lead level got High (had it checked)...but of course I was reloading too. So I dropped out of the indoor bullseye league and changed my approach to reloading (fmj or copper-clad bullets) and only shot lead outdoors and shot leadless ammo more on the indoor range. After a while my level went down...but it is still higher than the norm.
 
Old 09-01-2004, 06:34 PM   #10
JHP
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It is important to note the time between posts on this subject. Please listen and listen well.I believe without a doubt that one day all indoor ranges will mandate leadless ammo use to protect the health of shooters. This ammunition is readily available in most calibers at prices in line with regular ammo. I have been shooting for years and am not an alarmist. It is my wish to encourage as many people as possible to participate in the shooting sports.But I must point out that the subject of lead exposure is often downplayed. In fact it is often poorly maintained ranges and their owners who are the culprits. Many ranges are enforcing lead free ammo use, and others are spending substantial ammounts of capital to upgrade their ventilation systems to address the lead issue and they should be supported by all shooters. The two clubs that I frequent have unfortunatly not adopted a lead free policy and therefore I ALWAYS wear a mask that filters lead when I shoot indoors. These masks are readily available at a Home Depot or similar outfit. One of the arguments made by gun clubs against going lead free is that they don't want to impeed on reloaders. Today one can reload lead free primers and jacketed or plated bullets. I am in my middle forties and can remember the days of leaded fuel(Nova SS 396) and how many lobbied against it's ban for what seemed to be good reasons. We all want our children to share in the enjoyment of shooting. For their sake and for the sake of all shooters please pay attention to this issue. If you can get your range to go "green" great, if not use a mask and enjoy. Sorry if I'm long winded on this, and again let me say that I've been around the block as far as time spent on ranges, but it's because of this and seeing fellow shooters come down with high level of lead that I am commenting. I hope that the moderators and other experienced shooter will weigh in as well. I'm just a new guy.
 
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