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Old 09-26-2002, 11:23 AM   #1
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.375 H&H or ???

Have no idea what I would shoot with it, but have the itch to get a big bore I can acually carry in the woods.... Pros / cons of the big bores?
 
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Old 09-26-2002, 11:50 AM   #2
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pro: fun to shoot
con: hurts to shoot if shot too much

Actually, I can't think of any reason to own my .375 H&H. Except one: I wanted it. And I'd really like to have the .460 Weatherby that's sitting on the rack at the local store. But can't think of any good reason to own it either.

--Mark
 
Old 09-26-2002, 03:54 PM   #3
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Bruce,

I say go for it...but then I'm the genius who's having a wildcat .458 upper made for his AR.

Although I think of the .375 H&H as a medium rather than a big bore , it really is a versatile cartridge and with some creative reloading could easily be used on game from deer on up. I've used a .416 on everything from Egyptian geese (don't ask) through warthog and pukku on up to cape buffalo with total satisfaction. It' really just a matter of choosing the appropriate bullet/load.

Upside?

It's a classic caliber with tons of history behind it, very flexible in application with proper planning and, for a "bigger bore", a relative pussycat to shoot. Then there's the obvious opportunity for manly upsmanship. "Yes, I understand 200 grain bullets are quite popular amongst shooters in the gay community."

Downside?

Brass and bullets are a bit more expensive and the rifle's going to be be somewhat heavier than your average North American caliber, but hey, it's bloody .375 and you're a man, right?
 
Old 09-26-2002, 05:09 PM   #4
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David...have a couple .50 bmg's and have played some with the .338 lapua, so I enjoy what you mean about "bigger bore" I just don't have that little niche rifle, you know, the one you can actually sling, walk 5 miles and then blow the shit out of whatever you like :lol:

The .416 is in the running though, but ammo seems a good bit higher.
 
Old 09-26-2002, 06:29 PM   #5
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Bruce,

With a "couple .50 BMG's", you qualify as a GOD

For absolute versatility, i.e. the ultimate "niche rifle", I figure the '06 tops the list for N.A. game, the .375 H&H rules the roost as a medium, and for a true heavy, select from the .500/.465, .470, .450 #2, .458 Lott, .500 3inch, .505 Gibbs, genre.

If you are comfortable shooting the true big bores, I'm confident that a relatively light .375 would be a piece of cake to shoot and you could carry it all day. If I were looking for broad application, especially if skewed toward North American hunting, I'd take the .375 over the .416 without blinking an eye.

C'mon man, you know you want it!
 
Old 09-26-2002, 07:21 PM   #6
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Hi Bruce

I got my fist .375 H&H up in Idaho pulling shore duty. It was a Ruger #1 and did group around the 1" mark with Win 270 grain factory loads. It's a wonderfull caliber. A friend gave his Rem 700 375 H&H to his son, about 140 lbs and its his favorite Elk gun. Just break out some cast bullet loads and have fun.

Of all the calibers, a rifle man should have a 375 H&H in the rack, along with the 30/06, and the 7mm Mauser (7x57), plus the others that catch your fancy.

Some one wanted it more than I did so replaced it with a Rem 700 in 416 ... no one asks to shoot it. Mike
 
Old 10-03-2002, 03:26 AM   #7
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I bought a 375 H&H back in 1994 when I returned from one of my many trips with the military to Africa.

Its a Remington classic stocked in blue steel. I have since rechambered it to 375 JRS, which is just about a twin for the old 375 Weatherby.

I hunt elk and bear with it here in Colorado and dont really mind the added weight. I shoot Sierra 250's on top of a casefull of Varget.

Pro's- you can hunt most all chew-on-ya's with the 375. Ammo is actually easy to find compared to other big bores. Its an accurate round and likes a lot of different powders. A beautifully stocked 375 just smells like the Hotel New Stanley and fine scotch.

Cons- most African countries won’t let you hunt the big five with anything less than a .400/.410 bore. Some big bore snobs will look down their noses at you if you aren’t shooting something that ends in nitro, express or something like that. Found that a lot in Tanzania and Botswana. You will be overgunned for most all game in the lower 48. I dont think that is a bad thing though. More than one prairie dog has fallen to my 375...

Good luck to you on whatever you choose. Something magical happens when you shoot a big bore.
 
Old 10-03-2002, 06:29 PM   #8
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Amen to the .375 H&H

This is flat out the best caliber in the world. It will kill anything that walks ,flys and probably swims, with a proper bullet and a proper hit. With twice the recoil of a 3006 it stands at a comfortable power level as does the .300 Weatherby and .338 Winchester. Any more velocity and recoil (to me) becomes too sharp. Any more bullet weight (as in .416 or bigger) and recoil becomes ponderous to me. So I compare the .375 H&H to the .45 acp as being upper limit of energy for quick follow up shots (in a bolt gun). I have replaced the exalted .308 Win. as the best allround caliber, I think it's best place is where it was designed: a battle rifle. Ifeel the quickness of kill with the lack of destruction of meat in 270 grain loads makes it the best blacktail and boar rifle in Ca. And the best Oregon elk gun, and the best Alaskan gun with 300 grain loads. Who hunts over its 300 yd(and more) range? I use stainless 700 Remington in Brown precision stock with Leopold 1 1/2 - 6 in stainless mounts has gentry quiet brake and trigger job. Sub moa gun!!
 
Old 10-03-2002, 07:22 PM   #9
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Gordon, how do you like the Gentry break? I had my 416 mag-na-ported ... it never did have much rise in recoil but pushed streight back.

Drop down to 300 or 325 grain bullets in a 416 and you have a varmint gun like going from 175's in a 7mm to 120's ... But still good for all North American varmints. 8)

Every .375 H&H that I have shot or someone talked about (that's a good shot) report exellent accuracy .... Mike
 
Old 10-03-2002, 09:38 PM   #10
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re: Muzzle brake

I shot a 416 Rigby in 76 in Africa and I dont remember too much recoil only how heavy gun was after 20 miles in the sun. When I shot 416 Rem. Mag in 1996 in model 700 all I could think about was recoil. I think I am not as tough (sigh) but am becoming one gun man with the .375 H&H . The muzzle brake is the only one Ive really tried other than my Saturn brake on my .300 weatherby . I too have had many magna ported guns since mid seventies, swore by them , but I think that this brake probably is reason I can shoot a FEW rounds prone or rested without feeling too beatup by 270 grain bullets at 2700fps out of 7 lb rifle. Anytime 70 grains or more of powder goes off you better be wearing ear protection; ports or not. Also Gentry is one fine gunsmith. Incidently .338 mag is good rifle too, but somehow .375 finds me abandoning all other guns for big game hunting including 3006, 7mm mag and mauser, 308 and .35 remington and 45-70. The .375H&H does it all for big game hunting. Beware the one gun man. :wink:
 
Old 01-25-2003, 03:27 PM   #11
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There are two classic rifles, the 30-06, and the 375HHH. Both have almost the same ballistics. They both have a long history. My son has a Winchester 30-06. I shoot a left-handed Weatherby Mark-5 in .7mm Mag. on the small end. I have killed deer, Elk, and one Bear with the 375HHH on the big end. Yes it is overkill. Bigger is better and dead is dead. It is why I like the .45 vs. the .9mm pistols, even though, I own both. I agree there are not a lot of Lions or Elephants in the Mississippi, and Georgia woods. I just like my 375HHH.
 
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