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Old 08-07-2003, 01:41 PM   #1
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Brownells GunKote Finish

Hi Guys: Did anyone used Brownells GunKote spray in a can with good result? Any tips on how to use it? The info I got from Brownells is not very helpful because I want to re-finish my slide with it. Thanks!
 
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Old 08-07-2003, 02:56 PM   #2
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You will get better results if you buy the stuff in liquid form and use an airbrush, even a cheapo from Harbor Freight. Spray cans just don't give you much control, they sputter, etc. It can be done but the chances of getting runs and other problems are much greater with a spray can.
 
Old 08-07-2003, 06:38 PM   #3
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How does the slide rails wear if covered with GunKote tefloy/moly? Do you get any hardening or reduced wear?
 
Old 08-08-2003, 06:25 AM   #4
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No hardening. It will reduce friction to some degree due to the teflon and moly but it will eventually wear.
 
Old 08-08-2003, 07:59 AM   #5
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I coated several guns using Brownell's Teflon/Moly... with practice, I could prevent any runs - but you better be sure you can get coverage on one steady pass! You don't want to hesitate or slow down because it's coming out of that spray can at a heathly clip - for this reason, it is almost impossible to get any decent coverage on a slides' internal rails or breechface...

I kept buying the aeresol cans convincing myself that I could learn to "get it right".... so after much experimentation, I went and bought a really good airbrush to GunKote with - there is no comparision to the difference it makes in both application, end result and durability. It's kind of like the difference between painting a house with a fine bristle brush versus using a broom... the broom will cover everything, but the detail "cutting in" work gets a little messy...

IMHO...
 
Old 08-12-2003, 02:41 PM   #6
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Thanks a lot guys! I think I will get a cheap airbrush for the GunKote.
 
Old 08-12-2003, 04:26 PM   #7
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I found one at Harbor Freight for $10.
 
Old 08-12-2003, 05:48 PM   #8
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Just curious but where do you get Gunkote in liquid form? All I was able to find was the spray can version.
 
Old 08-12-2003, 06:01 PM   #9
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KG Industries is the manufacturer: http://www.kgcoatings.com/
They also have application instructions on their website.
 
Old 08-12-2003, 06:11 PM   #10
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Perfect, thanks Dave! Is there much of a difference between the 1600 and 2400 series?
 
Old 08-13-2003, 06:35 AM   #11
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The 1600 Series has more teflon. I haven't tried it but I believe it is softer and doesn't wear as well as the 2400.
 
Old 08-13-2003, 08:31 AM   #12
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Thanks Dave, I'll try the 2400 out then.
 
Old 08-15-2003, 06:18 AM   #13
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I tried using the teflon-moly coating in the spray can, but like Lazarus said, it is too easy to apply too thick a coat. You can only make a few quick passes, virtually ensuring you'll miss some difficult-to-reach spot. And after you use the can a couple times, the nozzle tends to get clogged and throw out the occasional big drop which looks like hell on the finish. After my nozzles got irreparably clogged, I drilled a hole in the can and drained out the rest of the paint to apply it with the airbrush (hey, this stuff is $25 a can, I'm not going to throw away half of it!)

Here are photos showing what to expect from a wear standpoint. I did this 1911 about four years ago, and it hasn't seen a whole lot of use (but probably more abuse than normal).




I have since begun to use Norrell's moly resin exclusively and I have to say it is much easier to apply, and easier to get good results. It also wears pretty well.
 
Old 08-15-2003, 06:44 AM   #14
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Like any paint job, surface prep is the key to a good, long-lasting finish. Blast with aluminum oxide or sand (bead blasting doesn't leave a rough enough surface for good adhesion), degrease well and don't handle the parts with your bare hands after degreasing. Warm the part in your oven before spraying. Here are 2 links for instructions on applying Gun Kote. These instructions should work for just about any spray and bake finish:
http://www.kgcoatings.com/gun-kote/application.html
http://www.tenring.com/Applygun.htm

I've never tried John Norrell's Moly Resin finish. How does it compare to Gun Kote?
 
Old 08-15-2003, 08:59 AM   #15
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Well, I've never tried Gun Kote so I don't know how much of a comparison I can really give you.

I can say that the Norrell stuff is pretty thin, almost water-like in consistency. This gives you a couple of advantages; namely it is easier to apply because it builds up much more slowly than Brownell's teflon moly, you really have to work hard to put too much on there. So you can get a good uniform coat without worrying about buildup. The other advantage is that it doesn't clog up the airbrush like the teflon-moly was prone to do. Also it cleans up with acetone or MEK. The downside of course is that it takes more paint to do a gun.

From a wear standpoint, I think it wears a little better than the teflon moly because it can be thinner. If it gets nicked, it tends to just scratch instead of coming off in chips like I see teflon moly doing (though this could've been due to how I did surface prep)

I would like to try GunKote but now I have almost all the Norrell colors. I might be interested in doing an abrasion test of GunKote and Norrell though. Guess I'll buy some black, you can never have too much of that.
 
Old 08-16-2003, 09:46 PM   #16
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I'm curious, what are you using for an oven to heat the parts?

Bryce
 
Old 08-17-2003, 08:49 AM   #17
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An old toaster oven. It's too small for long guns but it works fine for pistols. Buy your wife a new one and take the old one to the shop or look for an old one at a garage sale. Don't trust the heat control setting - buy an oven thermometer and use it to set the temperature.
 
Old 08-17-2003, 05:27 PM   #18
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Are you laying the parts in the oven or are you suspending them? The toaster ovens I've been looking at don't appear to be big enough to suspend the parts.

Thanks
Bryce
 
Old 08-18-2003, 05:57 AM   #19
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I lay the large parts on the wire rack and bake them then I put a piece of aluminum foil on the rack and put the small parts on that. I preheat the parts before I spray and the finish dries almost immediately so I've never gotten any marks on the finish when baking.

If you wanted to you could make some wire supports to hold the parts above the rack. Just make them so they will stand up on the rack.

Jump on in and try it! Heat up the oven and practice on some scrap parts. It's the only way you're going to find out what works and what doesn't before you try it on your gun.
 
Old 08-25-2003, 11:49 AM   #20
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I also use an old garage sale toaster oven. I have been using those little disposable aluminum foil cooking trays to hold my parts while baking. They look like a miniature cookie sheet and are just the right size to fit into the toaster oven. They're also handy for parts because the parts won't fall off the tray like can happen with a piece of foil.
 
Old 09-07-2003, 08:46 AM   #21
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Has anybody tried the gunkote over a pakerized piece?
how did it work. I was going to pakerize my gun just before applying the gunkote.
 
Old 09-07-2003, 09:14 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harley45
Has anybody tried the gunkote over a pakerized piece?
A parkerized surface is one of the best surfaces to apply Gun Kote on. Make sure you degrease before applying the Gun Kote unless it's fresh park that hasn't been oiled yet. If you've touched the surface with your bare hands it needs to be degreased.
 
Old 09-07-2003, 09:57 AM   #23
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Dave,
If I park it first do I still need to use the k-phos?
 
Old 09-07-2003, 11:31 AM   #24
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No, if you parkerize first you don't need to use the K-phos - this is what the K-phos does...
 
Old 09-13-2003, 11:15 AM   #25
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Hi Guys: Just want to know how many coats you suppose to spray on the parts to get a good result? Someone said one good coat but other told me at least 2 or 3 coats of Gunkote or MolyResin. Thanks, Andrew
 
Old 09-13-2003, 03:02 PM   #26
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It's the thickness of the coating that counts, not how many coats you apply. IIRC, you want about .0005 to .001 thick (check the links to the instructions I posted earlier). You can go heavier on areas that don't have critical tolerances such as the outside of the slide.
 
Old 09-13-2003, 04:55 PM   #27
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Dave - I have a question...

Sometimes when I have applied satin GunKote (fresh from KG), using an airbrush on top of K-phos'd metal (stainless, carbon steel & aluminum), proper tempertures maintained for 1 hour - some surfaces have occasional tiny "bumps"... these bumps are tiny and don't appear to be contamination, heat related "dimpling" or anything else I can figure out.

I blast the metal with Aluminum Oxide and have used fine, medium & coarse at different times and still this occasionally rears it's ugly head. Effected colors have been black, OD, gunmetal blue... but never dark gray, gray, SS or any flat color.

Any possible ideas where the gremlin might lie?
 
Old 09-14-2003, 09:46 AM   #28
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I'm only guessing but it could be from oil/water in your air line. You might try a filter in the line right before your airbrush. Is it possible that your airbrush is "sputtering" and spitting out large droplets of paint?
 
Old 09-14-2003, 11:10 AM   #29
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You see Dave... it's like this...

After reading your message I called my brother in law and said "Lee, when you stopped by to use my compressor to fix something... what'd you do?"...

Lee said - "Hmmm, I just hooked up my nail gun and drove 20 nails or so.... and man, I put oil in your line lubricator because it was so dry it looked like it had never had oil in it."

I'm thinking this falls in the category of "NEVER loan your tools to anyone"....

Thanks Dave... I need to go now and commit a felonious assault on a family member...
 
Old 09-14-2003, 11:47 AM   #30
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Oh there is poetic justice in the world... the last gun I Gunkote'd was HIS Remington 870.

Spite told me to tell him that I wouldn't fix it and redo it since he created the problem... then I remembered that long after I'm gone the work I did on his gun will bear my name and that was unacceptable - so after flushing my air lines tomorrow I've got to do some refinishing to do...
 
Old 09-14-2003, 03:11 PM   #31
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Don't waste your time flushing the line. You will never get it all out. Just keep that air hose for air tools. Buy another hose and use it for painting. Air hoses aren't that expensive - go to Home Depot, Lowes, etc.
 
Old 09-24-2003, 09:20 AM   #32
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Guys,
I have an air compressor for my garage with an inline water filter but no lubricator since I also use it for painting on rare occasions. To get around the lube issue for air tools, you can find small lubricators that attach to your air tools at the inlet and then the hose connects to the lubricator. This way, you never get lube in your lines.
 
Old 05-17-2006, 05:53 AM   #33
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GunKote

I admit that I have more than the average time behind a spray can but on my first try I was rather pleased with the results.
If you want perfection, and a wide variety of colors (flat, satin or gloss) buy it direct from KG Industries and apply it with an airbrush according to their detailed instructions.
Even a novice can expect outstanding results that last forever. This is great stuff!
 
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