Pistolsmith

Go Back   Pistolsmith > Pistolsmith Forum > Pistolsmiths


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-01-2012, 06:18 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Chrome1981's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rome, Italy
Posts: 3
Royal blue Bluing

Hello everybody!!!

i'm new member and i guess how make a Royal Blue Bluing.

Does Anyone know a right recipe or something that can i try?

Thank you very much!!
 
Remove Ads
Old 02-01-2012, 05:20 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,543
The Colt Royal Blue was not a chemical, it's the level that the metal is polished to.

There was an old saying that when other gun makers guns were in the trucks being delivered to the distributors, the Colt Python was still in the factory being polished.
The final polish was done with polishing media the consistency of flour.
Colt also polished with huge wooden polishing wheels covered with leather.
They made these in the factory.

Most any bluing chemical can be used to do a Colt Python level Royal Blue, but it takes a real expert with years of experience to polish the metal to that level without rounding off sharp edges or leaving ripples in the flat areas.
You can buy hot salts bluing chemical from Brownell's, but I don't think they can ship international due to the hazardous contents:

Bluing chemical:
OXYNATE® NO. 7 - Brownells

A bar minimum beginner's bluing tank system:
"FIRST STEP" BLUING KIT - Brownells

WARNING: Hot salts bluing operations are DANGEROUS due to the hot caustic chemicals. There is a real risk of getting steam explosions causing hot caustic chemicals splatter if a drop of water gets in the tank.
Since you have to add water to the tank, this is a very dangerious job. You must wear protective eye and face protection and clothing.
These hot chemicals WILL eat right through clothing and the skin under them.
Also, due to the extremely corrosive fumes you have to run the tank operation either in a special room or outside under a cover. The corrosive fumes will very badly rust anything in the same area.

Here's the giant polishing wheels Colt used to do the Royal Blue high polish finish on the Python:





Your best option is to find someone in your area who's able to do very high quality very bright polish bluing without over-polishing the metal and blurring the sharp edges and surfaces.

Last edited by dfariswheel; 02-01-2012 at 05:24 PM.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 03:21 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
one eye joe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,079
Dfariswheel, you never cease to amaze ! ! ! Welcome to the forum, Chrome 1981. I would suggest that you seek out a craftsman from the Brescia area of Italy to do this work for you.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 04:48 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Chrome1981's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rome, Italy
Posts: 3
Thank you very much for your precious advices!

Me and me chemist friend we have tried with nitre-bluing, (we bought 3 Kg of KNO3 on Ebay we are trying with small pieces of steel), maybe next week we are going to try rust-bluing method.

Unfortunatly Brownells don't ship this material to Italy, do u you have a recipe with the chemical components and proportions should I use?
i want try also for fun.

when is possible i'll put some pic.

Thank you!
(ps: sorry for my english)
 
Old 02-02-2012, 01:53 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 66
Rust bluing is easy and fun! George M.

CZ82


S&W M25
 
Old 02-02-2012, 06:23 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,543
Rust bluing is a type that can be done without a lot of equipment and it's a durable blue, but it's more a satin blue without the brilliant shine of Colt's Royal Blue.

For actual bluing formulas, I'd recommend buying this book from Brownell's:

FIREARMS BLUING AND BROWNING - Brownells

Here's a couple of formulas. Again, hot salts gun bluing is DANGEROUS.
You have to add distilled water, which is how the temperature is regulated.
When water contacts the chemicals you can get violent explosions that can splatter the chemicals. It WILL eat skin and eyes instantly.

The Roy Dunlap formula:

sodium nitrate 1/4 oz
potassium nitrate 1/4 oz
bichloride of mercury 1/2 oz
potassium chlorate 1/2 oz
distilled water 10 oz
spirits of nitre 1/2 oz

Here's several other home brews:

5 pounds lye
2 1/2 pounds ammonium nitrate
per gallon of water
---------------------------------------
65% Lye (aka sodium hydroxide)
35% Potassium nitrate (aka saltpeter)

Bath Formula

Ingredient Chemical Weight Weight
Materials Symbol Measure Ratio One Gallon
Water (softened) H20 4 Pounds 64 5.2 Pounds
Sodium Hydroxide NaOH 4 Pounds 64 5.2 Pounds
Sodium Nitrate NaNO3 1 Pound 16 1.3 Pounds
Sodium Nitrite NaNO2 1 Ounce 1 1.3 Ounces

Some Primary Hazards
(A partial listing)

These chemicals can be dangerous. NaOH ("Caustic") will rapidly attack flesh, clothing and many metals. Spills should be flushed quickly with vinegar to neutralize the caustic and minimize damage. Mix dry caustic into the water in 4 or 5 small steps to avoid boiling the solution, or use commercial 50% caustic solution. Wear caustic resistant gloves, aprons and eye protection at all times. Don’t use bore plugs, which will splatter hot caustic if they pop out. Dry NaNO2 and NaNO3 can be explosive, just like lawn fertilizer.

Bath Operation

The solution tanks must be un-galvanized iron, steel or stainless steel, with welded seams. Soldered or brazed seams will dissolve, ruining solution, tanks, and whatever gets leaked on. Adjust the bath to boil at 275 F (135 C) to 302 F (150 C) by adding water slowly through a large fine steel mesh to catch spattering caustic. Don’t go over 310 F (155 C), or the solution will be damaged. Turning the heat down won’t work, as the bath must boil gently. Handle parts with steel wire hooks or tongs. Degrease in a hot detergent or caustic solution and rinse well. Then put them in the hot bath right away. Hang them away from the sides or bottom of the tank, but small parts can be placed in a steel wire basket. Let them boil for ~ 10 minutes, then remove and rinse in clean cold running water. Check color after scrubbing with clean, degreased “0000" steel wool. Return to the bath until the color is good. Rinse thoroughly, dry, oil and reassemble.

Trouble Shooting

Polish your metal well. Blueing won’t cover poor polishing. Poorly polished white steel becomes poorly polished black steel. Protect polished parts from rust with light oil until ready to degrease and blue them. Anything a magnet won't pull on (like wood, glass, aluminum, plastic or stainless steel) won’t blue, so don't put it in the bath. It could dissolve and ruin both the part and the bath. If a used bath is heated but won’t work, try adding a little more caustic or nitrate.

No color, or red or purple tones can be due to low temperature, copper contamination, low NaNO3, high carbon alloys or too little time in the bath. Green or pale blue colors can be caused by low temperature or not enough boiling action in the bath. Splotchy or un-colored spots can be caused by poor cleaning or oil contamination. Sometimes this can be fixed while blueing by scrubbing with degreased “0000" steel wool. A powdery black that scrubs off is caused by a worn out bath. No color can be caused by a worn-out or overheated bath, wrong amounts of chemicals or (in old baths) by caustic being used up by CO2 in the air.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 02:22 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ocala, FL
Posts: 7
Colt used the "CARBONA" process. They used a rotating drum furnace running at around 600 deg F using charcoal. About the same as Nitre Bluing only using charcoal.

It is heat bluing. Chemical salts will not give you the Royal Blue color.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 03:15 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,543
Sorry, that's wrong.

Colt used the old Carbona process prior to WWII.
After the war, Colt changed to a modern hot salts bluing process.

The Colt "Royal Blue" ultra polish finish was first used on the Colt Python in 1955, and for many years the Royal Blue finish was known inside the Colt factory as "the Python finish".
Royal Blue didn't refer so much to the color as to the brilliant polish, the finest polish ever done on a semi-production pistol.
 
Old 02-06-2012, 03:43 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
one eye joe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,079
Welcome to the forum, douglas34474.....
 
Old 02-06-2012, 04:47 PM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ocala, FL
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfariswheel View Post
Sorry, that's wrong.

Colt used the old Carbona process prior to WWII.
After the war, Colt changed to a modern hot salts bluing process.

The Colt "Royal Blue" ultra polish finish was first used on the Colt Python in 1955, and for many years the Royal Blue finish was known inside the Colt factory as "the Python finish".
Royal Blue didn't refer so much to the color as to the brilliant polish, the finest polish ever done on a semi-production pistol.
And when Colt dropped the CARBONA bluing, they lost the COLOR. I'm sorry, but the ROYAL BLUE was standard on all early Colts. While the polish does effect the quality of the bluing job, it does not effect the COLOR. The polish on the the Python was indeed top of the line.

One eyed Joe, thanks for the welcome.
 
Reply

  Pistolsmith > Pistolsmith Forum > Pistolsmiths


Search tags for this page
bluing salts recipe
,
colt blueing
,
colt bluing process
,

colt royal blue

,

colt royal blue finish

,
high polish gun bluing
,
nitrate bluing
,
nitre bluing recipe
,
royal blue gun finish

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Royal bluing Rick Morgan Firearm Finishes 4 01-29-2009 04:49 AM
Old Colt Royal Blue Python? Hoser Colt Revolvers 12 11-21-2004 01:58 PM
rust removal on Colt Royal Blue Python? kpp80202 Firearm Finishes 1 08-03-2003 06:37 PM
Cold Bluing & Bluing 10mm Firearm Finishes 0 04-24-2002 11:49 AM
Who does Royal Blue blueing? CMHatem Firearm Finishes 3 12-24-2001 01:14 AM

Top Gun Sites Top Sites List


Powered by vBulletin 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright © 1999-2012 Pistolsmith. All rights reserved.