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Old 05-25-2003, 05:14 PM   #1
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: San Antonio, TEXAS
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.38 Spl. Military Brass/WCC

Once this stuff was like grains of sand, now...
Any ideas on a vendor for once-fired, 38 Special, Military WCC headstamp
brass?? (I have tried all the brass vendors in SGN & GL)
Thanks, Chuck Hunt
 
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Old 06-28-2003, 06:49 PM   #2
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WCC 38 cases

I'm afraid I can't exactly help you with your search, but I am just noticing a problem with some WCC 91 38 Spl cases I recently started loading. I am using a Dillon 650 and am noticing that with these cases (and only these) that the MAJORITY of them won't chamber in my S&W 64, my wife's S&W 14 or a friends S&W 686! They go in 1/4 to 3/8" and freeze in place, not one .001 farther. The other cases (any other) seem to chamber just fine. Is this brass thicker or something? I'm using 158 Gr LSWCs, but that is also common to the other cases I'm using. Any insight? Possible solutions? I hate to have to trash all this WCC brass, what a waste. This is a fairly new press, but I have insured that the sizing die is all the way down and locked to where it touches the shell plate when up. Could I SAFELY resize the loaded rounds (-decapper!) or would that increase bullet tension and jack pressures up?
Chris
 
Old 06-29-2003, 01:46 PM   #3
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38 spl military brass

I have never had this type problem-brass not sized enough to fit chambers
particularly with Dillon dies as they are quality products. Perhaps it is the brass. Yes, military brass is usually thicker-walled(esp.WCC) and that is
exactally why I wanted some more for +P loads. It's safer and longer lasting but you have to adjust your loads somewhat for the decreased interior powder space. The thicker walls increase your bullet-pull
slightly as well insuring better combustion(more consistent powder burn and velocity). However this stuff is getting very hard to find, as evidenced
by LACK of response to my query!
I have also never resized loaded ammo except to use a Lee factory crimp die. You might try posting this topic as a general question to the board as
many of the fellows are much more experienced than am I.
Regards and good shooting. Chuck Hunt
 
Old 06-29-2003, 03:50 PM   #4
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Never had the particular problem as I try to gage reloads early in the process (prefer Wilson gages from long habit but I don't think it matters). Sure resize loaded ammunition bearing in mind that just as with crimping dies you have a recoil plate and chamber and short barrel set-up. Further that there is a risk especially with work hardened brass of springback such that the brass is pushed in and springs back to a looser than previous tension - leading to setbacks in an autoloader and bullet pull in a revolver.

On the other hand I never relied on any particular brand label to assure me that any given set of dies was ideal for any particular combination of neck thickness, bullet diameter and brass hardness - that's why I would often check brass thickness - usally with a dial indicator against a post rather than a ball anvil mic but whatever works, measure loaded, fired, resized and reloaded case and bullet diameters - and pick dies from the motley accumulation of assorted roughly 38 calibers from 380 and 9 mm to .38 and .357 nominal dies both regular and carbide - truth is I fiddled more with expanders, including Lyman type M because I used to do a lot more breathing lead vapors than I do now.

If you have appropriate neck tension it will be very difficult to pull the bullets. I wouldn't hesitate to find a die, not necessarily the sizing die you previously used which will likely squeeze the lead bullet without spring back and leave you with small bullets in springback necks - rather I would look very hard for a slightly crumpled case at the base of the bullet or other reason why the operation failed and take it from there. Given the demand for decent neck tension with powders like 296 and H110 I have never worried so much about high bullet tension in pistol/revolver loads as about low bullet tension.
 
Old 06-29-2003, 04:37 PM   #5
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38 Sp

Chuck;

Are you post sizing? It is possible the bullet is bulging the case preventing full insertion.

Get another carbide sizing die and remove the decapping stem, post sizing die.

RePete.
 
Old 10-02-2003, 11:55 AM   #6
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There are a number of .38 Special cases out there I call "bad actors." I have exactly the same problem you describe. I size the heck out of them but they won't fully chamber. The worst "bad actor" is almost any WCC headstamped case. I throw them away. There are others. Keep a list of "bad actors" at your reloading bench. Don't bother trying to make them work. They are cheap. In my experience this "problem" is almost exclusive to the .38 Special, but I've found some .45 ACP that are "bad actors" as well.
 
Old 10-02-2003, 01:43 PM   #7
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"Throw away the bad actors". Yep, thats what I ended up doing, they ain't worth the hastle! All WCC 38 (weren't many) cases hit the round file.
Chris
 
Old 03-09-2004, 06:33 AM   #8
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bad wcc brass?

I too and having a problem with wcc brass. I got a lot of this from the range and when im trying to load primers into them they are not fitting good sometimes bending and breaking the primers. I thought it was my lee auto prime at first but I then noticed it was just happening with this wcc brass. Does anybody know if I could be doing something wrong or is this brass just not good for reloading? im speaking of 9mm here.

thanks,
mocboy
 
Old 03-09-2004, 11:34 AM   #9
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That sounds like you are running into military crimped primer pockets. The crimp must be removed prior to reprimeing by swageing or light reaming of the little ridge formed by this crimp.
Chris
 
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