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Old 06-16-2002, 05:55 PM   #1
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Location: Utah
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I would like some educated opinions. I'm in a situation where I have to pick an AR-15 as a patrol rifle. Being of the old school, I would rather use my 30-30 or 45-70 lever actions, but I can't. Here's my question:

Which AR-15 model (Colt only, my preference)should I choose?

They way I see it, here are the advantages and disadvantages of the CAR collasible stock vs. full size:

The collasible stock is meant mainly for storage, although it does have other advantages. These include being able to adjust length of pull for body armor, confined spaces, etc., although for house clearing, I would much prefer a pistol. The collasible also is the lowest weight model and can be handled more easily when exiting a vehicle. Disadvantages include having to remember to pull out the stock when seconds count, and also I have trouble developing a good stock (cheek)weld with a collapsible stock.

As to the full stock models, the 16in. and 20in. barrels have their advantages and disadvantages also. The 16 is still light, but you lose some storage and l.o.p. benefits. 20 is the heaviest, but gives you greater sight radius and probably another hundred fps or so on the round (as if that matters). Trust me, I know all these will be close range weapons.

So, what say everyone?

Thanks.
 
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Old 06-16-2002, 07:11 PM   #2
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JW, you might not be able to get exactly what you want from Colt's, but with a little tweaking, and changing of some of the inexpensive parts...
First, if it's not an LEO piece, a collapsible is out of the picture. If that's the case, get an A1 buttstock - it's 1" shorter, and works with and without vest for most. If a collapsible is on the gun, change it out for a new style(tall)one with 4 positions. Colt's 3 positions don't seem to fit anyone well.
Next, upper receiver - flattop offers the most flexibility, but I'd want that paired with a 16" lightweigtht barrel. Colt's formerly used this barrel on the "government carbine, #6520" I don't think it's produced in that configuration anymore, cause everyone thinks they need an M4 style barrel(after all, they look cool). The barrels are still available, though, through aftermarket suppliers like CDNN, RGuns, and KY sports.
Lights and slings are pretty individualized decisions, but take a look at the slings made by Chris Dwiggins at Gunsite. Simple, strong, and easy to use in many modes. Best of luck on the project. Let me know if I can help in any way.
 
Old 06-19-2002, 06:42 AM   #3
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Location: Central Texas
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I have both an HBAR 20" and a preban Gov't carbine. I am 6'06" and really have no problem with the collapsable stock. PRACTICE. I am the Colt armorer for my agency and I know they are still making the 6520. I have 20 that came in about a week ago. My preference is for the non flat top. I have the C-More scout scope on my carbine and it has some advantages over mounting on a flat top. To zero the C-More all I have to do is attain a proper iron sight picture and the dot appears on the front post. No need to shoot to re zero. If it gets dropped or bumped I can confirm zero fast and easy. If it goes out or out of zero I still have the factory sights. No need to go out and spend another $125 on a flip up arrangement.
I call my carbine my American Express (Don't leave home without it)
 
Old 06-19-2002, 09:45 AM   #4
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This is just my opinion, but I never understood the concept of having the larger heavier AR's over the lighter carbine type. If I were to carry a field rifle that's 8+ pounds I figure I might as well go with a .308 and have the advantages of the larger caliber.

I've always thought of the .223 as perfect for the carbine sized rifles. Lighter weight. More rounds could be carried for the same weight. Compact and fast handling. A carbine, especially with a collapsible stock just seems more versatile.
 
Old 06-19-2002, 12:52 PM   #5
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Join Date: May 2002
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Jw - The two potential problems you mentioned:

1. Forgetting to lengthen the stock

2. Poor check weld

Two words: Training issue

Not related to the weapon.

20" vs 16" - you sound like a bright guy - up on velocity and such. As such I am sure you have already considered a LW profile 20".

Botach has both the 6520 (A2, LW profile 16" collapse stock) and 6721 (A3, 16" heavy barrel, collapse stock)for $849.00


Good luck
 
Old 06-30-2002, 01:50 PM   #6
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Why not consider an Armalite or Bushmaster? I can understand your thing for Colt but there are better clones out there than a Colt. A Bushie won't have the slop in the upper/lower reciever that a colt will have and costs less too. But it's your weapon and your cash so spend it how you want. 8)
 
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