Pistolsmith

Go Back   Pistolsmith > Pistol Forum > SIG Pistols


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-09-2004, 08:06 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 6
SIG Trigger Jobs

I am relatively new to handguns, but have managed to accumulate four in the last year and a half.

I here people always talking about "trigger jobs". Now, I know in the abstract what this means. However, I have never handled two guns of the same model, one with and one without a trigger job.

So I was wondering is I need trigger jobs on my SIGs. As far as I am concerned, the triggers seem nice to me, but I have nothing to compare them to. Obviously, no one here can make that determination for me.

So what I was wondering was:

1. What can I expect from a SIG trigger job? What difference in the operation of the trigger could I expect from a trigger job?

2. What are some things I can look for in my current triggers to determine if a trigger job is worth it? I understand this may largely be subjective.

3. What would the life expectancy be on a trigger job? Is this something that needs to be done periodically, or does it last for a while?

I noticed several things this weekend shooting my 220ST and 228 side by side. The trigger on the 220 seems a bit lighter than the 228. The 228's double action pull also had a gritty feel to it. I just started practicing my double action shots, and the 228 had very low double action mileage. I performed about 150 double action dry fires and the gritty feeling went away, I assume as the components polished themselves in operation.

I appreciate any insight anyone can offer. Thanks.
 
Remove Ads
Old 08-09-2004, 03:43 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 47
if you are a new shooter than you probably don't need a trigger job and certainly not on a Sig...I have a Sig P228 that was tuned by Teddy Jacobson. He is arrogant and cocky but his work is second to none...Now, I will say that this was done to the pistol when I acquired it and I probably would have not spent the money to have it done. I do have a Smith and Wesson 3914 that would benefit from having a trigger job by Teddy Jacobson. Most of the time shooter want the "creep" taken out of the trigger or to have the length of pull or lbs. changed. This is an individual choice and other than Teddy's work I would not play around with a trigger job on a carry gun. My advice is to shoot the gun. Practive alot and you will probably find that the trigger will smooth out quite a bit as the parts work together.
 
Old 08-11-2004, 03:48 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 645
I have a new SIG 226R in .40. SIG claims a 4.5# SA pull, mine was closer to 6# new and did not lighten much with use.

As for a typical "trigger job", I did it to mine (Lighter mainspring, polished all contacting surfaces) and ended up with a clean breaking trigger at about 4.8#. Given the design, I don't think you can get the trigger very light. On mine, about 1 1/2 # of trigger pull is for raising the firing pin blocking plunger against it's spring. About 1 1/2# of trigger force to rotate the sear against it's spring, so you are at 3# already without considering the trigger return spring and the sear/hammer hook friction. I would think SA pulls in the range of about 4 - 4.5 is about as good as this thing will get and still be safe to use.
 
Old 08-12-2004, 09:24 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 6
Thanks for the replies. I probably just will not worry about it any time soon, and just practice on my own shooting skills. I doubt any of my guns are the weak point in my shooting - at this early stage I am sure it's all me. Thanks.
 
Old 08-13-2004, 04:49 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: King George, VA
Posts: 134
Re: SIG Trigger Jobs

Quote:
Originally Posted by mmike87
1. What can I expect from a SIG trigger job? What difference in the operation of the trigger could I expect from a trigger job?

2. What are some things I can look for in my current triggers to determine if a trigger job is worth it? I understand this may largely be subjective.

3. What would the life expectancy be on a trigger job? Is this something that needs to be done periodically, or does it last for a while?
A trigger job will eliminate the gritty double action feel (if present) as welll as single action trigger creep (if present). It can also reduce the pull weight of both DA and SA if desired. Most SIGs I have handled did not "need" a trigger job. By "need" I mean there was nothing in the factory trigger that significantly impaired accurate shooting. In many cases grittiness and creep will go away with use as the parts wear in together.

In terms of durability I believe a properly done trigger job should hold up indefinately in normal use.

The SIG Sport models come with factory trigger jobs and are significantly smoother and cleaner than the typical standard models. As a result they are a bit easier to shoot accurately. Only you can decide if the factory trigger in your gun is hurting your ability to shoot it.

My rule of thumb is if I am on the range (not dry firing) and conscious of trigger grittiness, creep, or how much pressure I have to apply when focused on the target and squeezing off the round - it might be worth correcting.

Hope the weather lets you get to the range and shoot that new Super - Tac
 
Old 08-13-2004, 08:11 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 645
For the record, after I did the trigger job on my 226 but still had the stock mainspring, the SA pull was about 4.8#. After I put in the reduced power mainspring, it dropped to about 4.2#.

The DA pull on mine is still too heavy (about 9#) and has a stagey feel, not a smooth linear progression. I have polished all the relevant contact areas, so I assume I will have to live with it.
 
Old 08-13-2004, 08:23 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: West
Posts: 18
Ernie Langdon does trigger jobs on SIGs besides Berettas. From what I read on his site it appears the double and single action can be reduced somewhat more. His site is at:

http://www.langdontactical.com/


Regards,

Hohn
 
Old 08-13-2004, 09:24 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,559
The DA "staging" can be greatly reduced. Polishing is just part of the trigger job.
 
Old 08-13-2004, 09:52 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Berryhill
The DA "staging" can be greatly reduced. Polishing is just part of the trigger job.
Well, I've done a few trigger jobs. The 226 DA trigger system is exactly like the Beretta 92/96: there is a trigger bar on the RHS with a spring support from underneath. The end of the bar has a hook that engages the "hook" on the bottom side of the hammer and pulls it forward (cocking the hammer against the mainsprin) until the trigger bar slips off the hook and the hammer falls. Assuming stock parts are being used, the leverage is what it is, and the spring force is what it is.... and smoothing and lubing the interfacing surfaces is about the only improvement available to the DA pull.

If you know any secrets, please feel free to share them.
 
Old 08-13-2004, 10:02 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hohn
Ernie Langdon does trigger jobs on SIGs besides Berettas. From what I read on his site it appears the double and single action can be reduced somewhat more. His site is at:

http://www.langdontactical.com/


Regards,

Hohn
From his sight on the level 3 trigger job:

This trigger job includes a LTT Competition Hammer Spring and a LTT Speed Bump Trigger. Trigger pull after work is approximately 7 lbs. in DA and 3.5 lbs. in SA. (Note: This set-up is not recommended for duty or carry pistols and may not be compatible with certain types of ammunition.)


I could also get mine down to about 3.5# SA and 7# DA if I went to a hammer spring so light it required the use of Remington primers. I don't really want to have to worry about ammo.

His level 1 job is:

The Level One trigger job is a basic action job that improves the weight and feel in both double action and single action on a SIG or Beretta. This trigger job includes a DAO model hammer spring. Trigger pull after work is a smooth 8 lbs. in DA and a crisp 4 to 4.5 lbs. in SA.


That's exactly what I did on mine and the SA pull measured out at just under 4# and the DA os jus about 8.5#. So, I have the level 1 performance. I just don't like the feel of the DA pull compared to my Berettas which are very smooth. The SIG almost feels like the mainspring is "stacking" (shifting coils) as it compresses which may account for the variable pressure feel.
 
Reply

  Pistolsmith > Pistol Forum > SIG Pistols


Search tags for this page
p290rs trigger job
,
polishing p226 trigger
,
sig 1911 trigger job
,
sig 290rs trigger job
,

sig p226 trigger job

,
sig sauer p226 trigger job
,
sig sauer p250 trigger job
,

sig sauer trigger job

,

sig trigger job


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How and what do you use for the camo jobs? spcwes Precision Rifles 5 04-15-2004 07:10 PM
Python Action Jobs tator2k Colt Revolvers 18 05-24-2003 08:09 AM
Trigger jobs? Dane Burns Workshop 13 04-29-2003 09:58 AM
Reliability jobs? Ken Sham Pistolsmiths 3 06-28-2001 06:01 PM
Trigger jobs SBLars M1911 Pistols 24 06-04-2001 10:38 AM

Top Gun Sites Top Sites List


Powered by vBulletin 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright © 1999-2012 Pistolsmith. All rights reserved.