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Old 03-12-2006, 06:58 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 77
Pinnacle 9x23

My new 9x23 returned from the pistolsmith this past week so I though I'd share some pictures of it along with some impressions of my first reloading efforts with it. To get things started, a picture. All of the pictures here were taken at the range and the multicolor background is a piece of scrap rug that I use to lay pistols on instead of directly on the wooden tables.



In addition to the basics, Mark Hartshorne of Pinnacle High Performance worked his toolmaker's magic on fit. finish, and cosmetics. In the picture above you can see a hint of his magic touch on the front strap and the precisely fit beavertail. You can also see the trigger he created and fit to the frame. The face of the trigger is perfectly flat with very fine vertical serrations and is the best feeling trigger I have every worked with.

Pistol Specs
  • Springfield Loaded 9mm stainless frame[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Smith & Alexander grip safety[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Caspian carbon steel slide[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Novak adjustable sight[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Nowlin ramped barrel[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Pinnacle trigger[/*:m:3but5bdg]


The picture above shows Mark's handiwork on the front strap. Not exactly checkering but not exactly dimpling or stipling. A year ago he figured out a way to drill multiple, shallow holes that resulted in this unique pattern. It is not as "grabby" as checkering but much more secure than stipling. He did this to my Colt Mustang last year and I was so impressed with its handling characteristics that I asked him to do it to this 1911.



This picture shows the end product of drilling multiple, shallow holes on the mainspring housing. Oh, I also asked him to whack off the corner of the mainspring housing to make concealed carrying of the pistol a bit easier. I find that the square corner on 1911's poke out my covering shirt or wear on the lining of my suit jacket. This "mini-bobtail" eliminates those problems.



Here's another look at the mainspring housing. If you look carefully, you can see a gap between the Wilson magazine and the frame. Mark did a mega-mag well beveling job that extends way into the mainspring housing. Totally cool. Although it doesn't show up clearly in the photo, he also polished the ends of the various pins that protrude through the frame. How can you quibble with attention to detail like this? Almost forgot to mention the thin grips. They provide a unique feel to the pistol that I like.

Reloading

Does it shoot as good as it looks? Of course. What did you expect? Factory Winchester jacketed soft points and Silvertips all go where the sights are pointed. But I don't want to shoot factory ammo when I'm out punching holes in paper and tin cans. I wanted to work up an accurate, functional, and cheap lead reload.

I've been reloading for .45 ACP for many years and have lots of Bullseye at the reloading bench so it made sense for me to use it in my load development rather than spending big bucks for a pound of Vihtavuori. Also, I had a couple of boxes of 9mm National Bullet Company cast bullets on hand (100gr, 120gr, 125gr, 135gr). So, I did 10 rounds of each bullet weight with 10 different amounts of Bullseye ranging from 4.0 gr to 5.8 gr.

That worked out to 400 rounds that I sent down range yesterday. Out of all those different combinations six showed promising accuracy. I will be refining these six loads as time goes on to determine which one will be the one I will use for a general tin can, paper punching load.

Leading of the barrel was not an issue with any of the loads. The pistol preferred the hotter loads and was not nearly as accurate with the slower loads. Needless to say the pistol did not have a single failure of any kind with the factory ammo or with any of the lead reloads.

Bad Mouthing the 9x23

Well, not really. Maximum ballistics are awe inspiring. It doesn't have the torquing recoil of a .45 and the slide cycles incredibly fast. However, for an old .45 guy like me, reloading it for the first time was weird. The cases are so small I fumbled a number of them. It was like trying to handle pencils after decades of handling tree trunks. However, well worth the effort. I look forward to discovering the ideal plinking load for this caliber using commonly available and reasonably priced components.

Final Look



Here's the right side of the pistol where you can see the Pinnacle trigger, the polished end of the slide stop pin, and the general smoothing of all the sharp edges. Sharp edges look good but are not friendly to my hand during gun handling drills or IDPA matches. You can also see Mark's business logo (the three mountain peaks).



Finally, here's Mark's treatment of the top of the slide. You'll have to forgive my use of ear muffs to hold the pistol upright for the picture. The adjustable Novak sight is clearly visible. Its sight picture takes a little getting used to since the protective sides of the sight extend above the top of the rear sight. However, I really like having the ability to adjust elevation but within a sight that you could probably use to whack a bad guy with and not have it move. The grooves are purely cosmetic but they add a nice touch of class.
 
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Old 03-13-2006, 07:53 AM   #2
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 6
very nice
 
Old 03-14-2006, 03:35 AM   #3
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 555
very nice...

lots of little extra touches....

thanks for sharing.
 
 
Old 03-14-2006, 04:13 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: TEXAS, by GOD
Posts: 203
Very good read.
Thanx and
Blessings
 
Old 03-18-2006, 07:44 PM   #5
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 33
Trigger

Tell me about that Trigger...

and was the front strap treament price wise
very close to the checkering prices...

Thanks
Jerry K
 
Old 03-19-2006, 12:01 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 77
Re: Trigger

Quote:
Originally Posted by supercomp9
Tell me about that Trigger...
The trigger is aluminum and has no overtravel screw. Instead, the trigger itself extends slightly to the rear at the bottom and acts as the overtravel limiter. I never liked the feel of the overtravel screw hole on my finger so this cures that problem. I've tried a variety of triggers in 1911's over the years - everything from perfectly smooth and rounded to coarse with sharp edges. Marks' tirgger suits me the best.

Here's a shot of one side of the trigger. Note the extended portion of the lower half of the rear of the trigger.



The pic below is a head-on shot of the trigger pad. You can see the very fine serrations. I had to place a steel rod through the bow to make it stand upright for the picture.



In the interest of full disclosure, here is the back of the trigger.



Quote:
and was the front strap treament price wise
very close to the checkering prices...
I honestly don't know. Mark has the prices for his services on his website but the fact is I like this much better than the 20lpi checkering I have on another 1911.
 
Old 03-26-2006, 06:07 AM   #7
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 571
You have one beautiful pistol! You cannot carry a pistol like that concealed, it has to be visible. Too pretty to hide. (just don't show it off in a Bank)

I have two 9x23 pistols and they prefer the faster loads too. I tried some loads in the 9 mm range and got poor results. I don't understand how that works, but that's the way it is.

As far as shooting on the cheap; it is no more expensive to shoot than a super and less than a .45 if you recover your brass. You can shoot Super if you like, but I don't see the point.

I use Starline Brass for all my target loads and I use the Winchester Brass for anything of substance. I have found that several different ammo manufacturers use the Starline Brass. It must be pretty darn good and it is a lot cheaper than Winchester Brass.

If you want to try some of the WAP data you find in the old Winchester Reloading books or on the net; Ramshot Silhouette is the same powder under a different name. I have been using some of the loads I found with this powder and like it a good bit. Some of the best loads come from VV and H powders, too.

Enjoy your gorgeous pistol.

Buddy
 
Old 02-23-2012, 04:50 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 77
My new 9x23 returned from the pistolsmith this past week so I though I'd share some pictures of it along with some impressions of my first reloading efforts with it. To get things started, a picture. All of the pictures here were taken at the range and the multicolor background is a piece of scrap rug that I use to lay pistols on instead of directly on the wooden tables.



In addition to the basics, Mark Hartshorne of Pinnacle High Performance worked his toolmaker's magic on fit. finish, and cosmetics. In the picture above you can see a hint of his magic touch on the front strap and the precisely fit beavertail. You can also see the trigger he created and fit to the frame. The face of the trigger is perfectly flat with very fine vertical serrations and is the best feeling trigger I have every worked with.

Pistol Specs
  • Springfield Loaded 9mm stainless frame[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Smith & Alexander grip safety[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Caspian carbon steel slide[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Novak adjustable sight[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Nowlin ramped barrel[/*:m:3but5bdg]
  • Pinnacle trigger[/*:m:3but5bdg]


The picture above shows Mark's handiwork on the front strap. Not exactly checkering but not exactly dimpling or stipling. A year ago he figured out a way to drill multiple, shallow holes that resulted in this unique pattern. It is not as "grabby" as checkering but much more secure than stipling. He did this to my Colt Mustang last year and I was so impressed with its handling characteristics that I asked him to do it to this 1911.



This picture shows the end product of drilling multiple, shallow holes on the mainspring housing. Oh, I also asked him to whack off the corner of the mainspring housing to make concealed carrying of the pistol a bit easier. I find that the square corner on 1911's poke out my covering shirt or wear on the lining of my suit jacket. This "mini-bobtail" eliminates those problems.



Here's another look at the mainspring housing. If you look carefully, you can see a gap between the Wilson magazine and the frame. Mark did a mega-mag well beveling job that extends way into the mainspring housing. Totally cool. Although it doesn't show up clearly in the photo, he also polished the ends of the various pins that protrude through the frame. How can you quibble with attention to detail like this? Almost forgot to mention the thin grips. They provide a unique feel to the pistol that I like.

Reloading

Does it shoot as good as it looks? Of course. What did you expect? Factory Winchester jacketed soft points and Silvertips all go where the sights are pointed. But I don't want to shoot factory ammo when I'm out punching holes in paper and tin cans. I wanted to work up an accurate, functional, and cheap lead reload.

I've been reloading for .45 ACP for many years and have lots of Bullseye at the reloading bench so it made sense for me to use it in my load development rather than spending big bucks for a pound of Vihtavuori. Also, I had a couple of boxes of 9mm National Bullet Company cast bullets on hand (100gr, 120gr, 125gr, 135gr). So, I did 10 rounds of each bullet weight with 10 different amounts of Bullseye ranging from 4.0 gr to 5.8 gr.

That worked out to 400 rounds that I sent down range yesterday. Out of all those different combinations six showed promising accuracy. I will be refining these six loads as time goes on to determine which one will be the one I will use for a general tin can, paper punching load.

Leading of the barrel was not an issue with any of the loads. The pistol preferred the hotter loads and was not nearly as accurate with the slower loads. Needless to say the pistol did not have a single failure of any kind with the factory ammo or with any of the lead reloads.

Bad Mouthing the 9x23

Well, not really. Maximum ballistics are awe inspiring. It doesn't have the torquing recoil of a .45 and the slide cycles incredibly fast. However, for an old .45 guy like me, reloading it for the first time was weird. The cases are so small I fumbled a number of them. It was like trying to handle pencils after decades of handling tree trunks. However, well worth the effort. I look forward to discovering the ideal plinking load for this caliber using commonly available and reasonably priced components.

Final Look



Here's the right side of the pistol where you can see the Pinnacle trigger, the polished end of the slide stop pin, and the general smoothing of all the sharp edges. Sharp edges look good but are not friendly to my hand during gun handling drills or IDPA matches. You can also see Mark's business logo (the three mountain peaks).



Finally, here's Mark's treatment of the top of the slide. You'll have to forgive my use of ear muffs to hold the pistol upright for the picture. The adjustable Novak sight is clearly visible. Its sight picture takes a little getting used to since the protective sides of the sight extend above the top of the rear sight. However, I really like having the ability to adjust elevation but within a sight that you could probably use to whack a bad guy with and not have it move. The grooves are purely cosmetic but they add a nice touch of class.
 
Old 02-23-2012, 04:51 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 77
The trigger is aluminum and has no overtravel screw. Instead, the trigger itself extends slightly to the rear at the bottom and acts as the overtravel limiter. I never liked the feel of the overtravel screw hole on my finger so this cures that problem. I've tried a variety of triggers in 1911's over the years - everything from perfectly smooth and rounded to coarse with sharp edges. Marks' tirgger suits me the best.

Here's a shot of one side of the trigger. Note the extended portion of the lower half of the rear of the trigger.



The pic below is a head-on shot of the trigger pad. You can see the very fine serrations. I had to place a steel rod through the bow to make it stand upright for the picture.



In the interest of full disclosure, here is the back of the trigger.





I honestly don't know. Mark has the prices for his services on his website but the fact is I like this much better than the 20lpi checkering I have on another 1911.
 
Old 02-24-2012, 06:31 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 489
Okay, I'm REALLY confused here...did this thread eat tanna leaves and come back to life, like the mummy? or do we have a zombie problem, or what?
 
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