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Old 07-20-2002, 06:53 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen A. Camp
Hello. Thanks for the encouragement. I'll never be good as the pros here and elsewhere nor many of the amateurs, but I think I can improve.
If what I have seen (in terms of improvement) in just a few weeks is any indication, you are going to be *scary good* in no time at all. I thought the Hi-Power shot outdoors (wood background), did have something of a 'Burnsian' quality about it. As always Stephen, you are far too modest.

Quote:
One thing I have learned is to take more pictures than I think I'll need and to shoot from about every angle I can. Out of those, I take what I think are the best ones. I get rid of the others. Then I pick the "best" of those and keep narrowing the selections to just one or two.
That is one of the best things about digital photography -- you can click to your hearts content, but not incur the expense, that one normally associates with conventional (silver halide) photography and 'burning through' rolls of film. The digital medium should encourage people to experiment more; with different angles, lighting effects and varying their compositions. Pros do exactly what you are doing; take lots, and lots of shots, and then choose the very best, from among the many taken.


DD
 
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Old 07-22-2002, 06:35 PM   #12
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Hello. I know that the lighting's not as good as a pro would do, but in this picture, I'm trying to highlight the holster while keeping the black gun light enough to be visible w/o making the brown, wood background either too light or too dark.

What would you do to enhance this effort? Right now, I have nothing but the little flash on the camera, tissue paper, and natural light to work with.

Thanks in advance.

Best.





 
Old 07-22-2002, 11:48 PM   #13
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Hi Stephen,

I would just turn the built-in flash on the camera off, and work on using natural light more effictively. Maybe try a home made reflector to add some fill light; or try working on experimenting with some of the lighting ideas I wrote about in the "critque" thread, as well as the ideas and links from the "macro" thread? You might be able to dig up something around your house to fashion a light tent from, and play with diffusing light in that way. Broad, even, well diffused lighting -- is just not going to happen -- with that tiny built-in flash. Indoors, you will definitely need much more, to produce the kind of images you are working towards. Fear not the light!

We haven't opened this can of worms yet; but imaging software, such as PhotoShop, can allow you to do some amazing things with digital images. As long as the 'bones' of a good photo (i.e. compostion) are there, many of the lighting problems can be dealt with. However, there is a pretty fair learning curve with such software, and many times the images can actually be made worse by such efforts. Your investment in time, may be better spent, working on getting a handle on lighting. The only way to accomplish that, is to just jump in and get your feet wet. Fortunately with digital photgraphy, you can burn through a bunch of practice shots, and delete anything you don't like, and you are only out the time spent on that efftort.


DD
 
 
Old 07-23-2002, 06:10 AM   #14
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Hello, and thanks for the advice. I've kind of decided that on my own. I did kind of cheat on the picture of the Browning in the holster. There was much glare from the flash on the magazine and I did airbrush that out using the "air brush" thing on the imaging software on my computer. I won't mention how many tries it took to get even acceptable!!!!!!

Best and thanks again.



 
Old 07-23-2002, 07:04 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen A. Camp
There was much glare from the flash on the magazine and I did airbrush that out using the "air brush" thing on the imaging software on my computer. I won't mention how many tries it took to get even acceptable!!!!!!
As I have my obsessive/compulsive moments Stephen, I have a pretty fair idea how much time one can put in to such efforts... :roll: I suspected you might have done a little software image manipulation. Is one of the areas you airbrushed, start at the mouth of the magazine, and runs along that ridge and heads due east -- kind of shaped like the outline of a small countersink screw? If you wanted to, you could get rid of the light reflection spots on the holster by software manipulation, but then again, reshooting with better lighting, would likely yield a more pleasing end result.


DD
 
Old 07-23-2002, 07:11 AM   #16
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Hello. Yes, I believe you on that. The natural lighting is likely the best way to go for me, at least right now.

I shot the picture below using natural light only. I didn't think we'd seen any of these old things on this area yet.



I didn't have a tripod, but did brace my elbows.

Best.



 
Old 07-23-2002, 12:47 PM   #17
 
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Stephen,

Now that is a nice picture.


Ray
 
Old 07-23-2002, 01:22 PM   #18
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Hello and thanks. Just kind of practicing some of the things I've read.
Best.



 
Old 07-25-2002, 05:48 PM   #19
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Hello. This doesn't look like much, but it's kind of a step forward for me in that I was trying to photograph polished stainless and get reflections, but also get the black, rubber stocks to show up. I can sure see how having off-set and separate lights are a must for "magazine quality" pictures.

Best.





 
Old 07-26-2002, 12:16 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen A. Camp
I can sure see how having off-set and separate lights are a must for "magazine quality" pictures.
Some would say: Lighting is everything in photography. While that is a something of an overstatement in my view, it IS (as you have discovered) hugely important to producing images that go beyond snapshot categorization.

You might be surprised, that with a little looking around your own home (or a friends) there may already be the items needed to improvise for your lighting needs. I have seen saw horses on top of a table; and an old bed sheet (with a whole cut for the lens) drapped over them; and an odd assortment indoor reading and outdoor portable flood and spotlights used to light this 'tent'; and render some pretty darn profesional looking images.

BTW, while I understood what you meant by "magazine quality" Stephen, I would argue that several of the images you have posted already, exceed the quality observed in some of the gun rags. Aim high my friend -- "Ichiro quality" firearms photography, is the accolade I would like to see associated with the finer images displayed in this forum.


DD
 
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