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Old 08-25-2013, 08:28 AM   #1
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Recoil spring fun

Im trying to find a formula to figure what poundage I need, or if one of you fine folks happens to know I would be greatly obliged.

I am building a commander size 1911 with slab sides, uncut in the front, in .40S&W with a second barrel in .357SIG. Anyone have any clue what poundage I need to make this monstrocity run properly and well? I'm figuring Ill need 2 springs, but I don't know which/what I need/should buy.

Also, has anyone ever welded on a frame? I'm thinking about taking a bit of 4140 I have and welding it onto the end of the dust cover to make it look similar to the monolith that les baer makes. I'm planning on cerakoting this gun anyhow, so the discoloration when blued is not even a consideration/concern.

Thank you in advance everyone!

Last edited by 1911A1Junkie; 08-25-2013 at 08:34 AM.
 
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Old 08-25-2013, 12:42 PM   #2
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Try a 16 pound spring. Should be good to go.
 
Old 08-25-2013, 03:02 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyT View Post
Try a 16 pound spring. Should be good to go.


For which caliber? Or both?
 
 
Old 08-25-2013, 05:02 PM   #4
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Can't help with the springs for those calibers, but welding on the end of the dust cover is not an issue for a gunsmith/welder who knows his stuff.

That area is under no stress so as long as you prevent heat spreading back you should have no problem.
Beveling the inside and outside to give a good fill will help in strength and in making a strong job.
Just butting the parts up and welding is not good.
 
Old 08-26-2013, 01:53 AM   #5
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Quote:
For which caliber? Or both?
It'll work for both. If you're concerned with impact, maybe step up to an 18 pounder for the .357 Sig. Commander-length guns don't generally play well with shock buffers, but yours may be the exception. Try it and see.
 
Old 09-25-2017, 06:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1911A1Junkie View Post
Im trying to find a formula to figure what poundage I need, or if one of you fine folks happens to know I would be greatly obliged.

I am building a commander size 1911 with slab sides, uncut in the front, in .40S&W with a second barrel in .357SIG. Anyone have any clue what poundage I need to make this monstrocity run properly and well? I'm figuring Ill need 2 springs, but I don't know which/what I need/should buy.

Also, has anyone ever welded on a frame? I'm thinking about taking a bit of 4140 I have and welding it onto the end of the dust cover to make it look similar to the monolith that les baer makes. I'm planning on cerakoting this gun anyhow, so the discoloration when blued is not even a consideration/concern.

Thank you in advance everyone!
Different grain bullets vary in blast energy thereby opposing recoil spring during cycling & may cause feed, eject, last rd lock open issues. Interesting info to study..

Sent from my E6782 using Tapatalk
 
Old 05-24-2018, 09:51 PM   #7
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you can easily warp the dust cover with welding heat. I'd find a way to clamp a snug fittig steel rod inside of the dust cover, and use heat control gel to keep the heat from spreading to the frame. I'd also use a tig, with very small diameter rod and just add "tacks' of weld-bead, letting each one cool and then blend them all together.
 
Old 06-12-2018, 03:59 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hereby View Post
you can easily warp the dust cover with welding heat. I'd find a way to clamp a snug fittig steel rod inside of the dust cover, and use heat control gel to keep the heat from spreading to the frame. I'd also use a tig, with very small diameter rod and just add "tacks' of weld-bead, letting each one cool and then blend them all together.
If you're referring to welding up the cracks that form at the junction of the dust cover and the frame rails, it's a waste of time. Those cracks form because of stress risers caused by sharp corners and the thin cross sections, and they stop once the stress is relieved.

I have a pair of early 1991A1 Colts that I use strictly for beater duty. They both cracked there many years and many tens of thousands of rounds ago. Both pistols run just fine.
 
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